Frequently Asked Firework Questions

What precaution should people take when using fireworks?

There are many precautions one should take when using fireworks:

  1. Follow your local and state laws regarding the display and possession of Consumer Fireworks.
  2. NEVER allow children to handle, play with and or light any type of fireworks including hand held sparklers
  3. DO NOT consume alcoholic beverages before or while handling consumer fireworks.
  4. Always light consumer fireworks on a hard, flat, and level surface.

What are the different classifications of fireworks?

There are two main types of fireworks: Consumer Fireworks and Display Fireworks.

  1. Consumer Fireworks: These are most commonly sold at neighborhood stands and can be used by non-licensed professionals.
  2. Display Fireworks: These are used in large community displays run by licensed professionals. These devises are not intended for use by consumers

How do Fireworks work?

The basic ingredient of fireworks is gunpowder. The "paints" of a pyrotechnic device are the different chemicals added during production. These chemicals provide the dazzling array of colors and visual effects as well as the sounds (reports) that accompany the burst. The manufacturer carefully selects the chemicals to be used and determines the order in which they are packed into the casing in an effort to create a specific visual effect. Once the materials are packed into the casing, a fuse is affixed so that the device can be safely ignited.

How old do I have to be to buy Fireworks?

A: You must be at least 21 years of age or 18 years of age with active military ID to purchase and possess fireworks.

Can I buy Bottle rockets at your store?

NO, we don't sell those items at our store - Per New Hampshire state law, Rockets are not allowed to be sold at fireworks outlets in New Hampshire and are illegal for consumer use in New Hampshire.

Are M-80s, Cherry Bombs or Silver salutes still legal?

NO. Those devices are federally banned explosives and we do not sell them. They were banned in the United States in the early 1970s. Please don't ask us for them!


Firework Definitions

1.4G Explosives

Formerly known as Class C common fireworks. Items classified as 1.4G explosives are consumer fireworks intended for use by the general public.

Aerial Shell

A cartridge containing pyrotechnic composition, a burst charge, and an internal time fuse or module, that is propelled into the air from a mortar.

Barrage

A rapidly fired sequence of aerial fireworks.

Battery

A collection of fireworks devices, such as a group of mortars (finale battery) or a bundle of roman candles (candle battery,) fused together in such a manner that they are fired within a short period of time.

Cake

A chain-fused firework that propels a series of aerial shell, comet or mine effects into the air from collectively attached tubes.

Comet

A pellet of composition which is propelled from a mortar or shell and produces a long tailed effect. Large comets are constructed much like aerial display shells, with attached lift charge ready for loading into mortars.

Fountain

Device that projects a spray of sparks.

Lift Charge

The composition that propels (lifts) the pyrotechnic device into the air.

Mine

A device containing multiple pyrotechnic effects that are simultaneously ignited and dispersed into the air from mortar or tube.

Mortar

A tube from which certain aerial devices are fired into the air.

Novelty

A device containing small amounts of pyrotechnic and/or explosive composition but does not fall under the category of consumer fireworks. Such devices produce limited visible or audible effects. Examples are snakes, tanks, poppers, and snappers.

Report

A component of an aerial display shell or mine. A report contains salute powder, a powerful pyrotechnic composition (usually flash powder) which explodes violently, producing a loud noise with the visual effect of a bright flash and smoke.

Roman Candle

A chain-fused firework that propels a series of aerial shell, comet or mine effects into the air from a single tube.

Single Shot Mortar

Usually a pre-loaded tube that contains one shot of various aerial effects. This is not reloadable.

500 Gram Multi Shot Aerial (Cake)

This is a large multi-tube aerial firework. This has more than one shot with lighting only one fuse. It is packed with 500 Grams of powder divided among the lift charges and aerial shells, which is the maximum amount of powder allowed on any multi shot device per Federal law.

350 Gram Multi Shot Aerial (Cake)

This is a medium sized multi-tube aerial firework. This has more than one shot with lighting only one fuse. It is packed with 350 Grams of powder divided among the lift charges and aerial shells.

200 Gram Multi Shot Aerial (Cake)

This is a smaller sized multi-tube aerial firework. This has more than one shot with lighting only one fuse. It is packed with 200 Grams of powder divided among the lift charges and aerial shells.

Reloadable Mortar (Artillery Shell)

Reloadable Mortars are firework shells that have both different effects to them as well as sizes. All reloadable shells come with their own tubes that are made of either fiberglass, H.D.P.E (High Density Poly-Ethylene) or cardboard. Canister shaped shells contain 60 grams of powder and are 1.75" wide. They are shot out of a mortar and may have single or multiple breaks.

Sparkler

A type of hand-held firework that burns slowly while emitting colored flames, sparks, and other effects.

Fountains

Are a ground firework that emits showers of sparks upwards. You are able to distinguish a fountain from an aerial firework by its warning label which reads "Emits Showers of Sparks." Fountains come in all shapes and sizes, spray all different heights and some of them also produce an audible effect.